Pet Food Ingredients

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What's in a pet food flavor ?

Pet Food Ingredients

What’s in a Pet Food Flavor?

Posted by Susan Thixton on July 31, 2013 at 11:57 am

A great deal of research has been done to find the exact right flavorings for pet foods. But probably not for the reasons you’d think. To quote a recent Popular Science article titled The Chemistry of Kibble "The billion-dollar, cutting-edge science of convincing dogs and cats to eat what’s in front of them." There’s nothing like using their own words to explain the truth about pet food.

It started with this (rather insulting) video : WATCH VIDEO

"Kitty crack." "These flavorings or coatings entice animals to eat food or treats that while nutritious aren’t part of their native diet." "Scents like Cadavernine and Putrescence tend to grab a dogs attention." Is this how the industry thinks about our pets?

This video led to an article on the Popular Science website titled "The Chemistry of Kibble". The article, a close look at the pet food flavoring plant AFB International states "To meet nutritional requirements, pet food manufacturers blend animal fats and meals with soy and wheat grains and vitamins and minerals. This yields a cheap, nutritious pellet that no one wants to eat. Cats and dogs are not grain eaters by choice, Moeller is saying. "So our task is to find ways to entice them to eat enough for it to be nutritionally sufficient."

So"¦to get dogs and cats to eat a "cheap pellet" which contains grains "“ of which dogs and cats are "not grain eaters by choice", the challenge to pet food manufacturers is to add the right flavorings to "entice" the dog or cat to "eat enough (of the "cheap pet food that no one wants to eat") for it to be nutritionally sufficient."

One interesting point in the article was about cats. While most of us that have cats know they are often picky eaters, Nancy Rawson of AFB International says "outdoor cats tend to be either mousers or birders, but not both." Which is why cats often prefer to stick to one type of food. But the article also tells pet food consumers not to worry"¦because "Most of the difference between Tuna Treat and Poultry Platter is the name and the picture on the label." The author says that a tuna pet food and a poultry pet food might taste exactly the same to the cat (and appears to state there is very little difference in ingredients as well).

With cats, the flavor additive of choice is pyrophosphates. It is not completely understood why pyrophosphates entice cats to eat. A study published in PetFoodIndustry.com magazine (from another pet food flavorings company Monell Chemical Senses Center) states "the possibility that pyrophosphate could act as a modulator of the activity of the cat’s amino acid receptor." Monell Chemical Senses Center has found that mixing pyrophosphates (phosphate salts) with meat hydrolysates is the most effective enticer of cats to a food.

In a very basic non-scientific explanation, meat or meat by-product ingredients are broken down by use of water. The amino acids (building blocks of protein "“ that cats are looking for) remain in the meat hydrolysate are basically magnified in taste (for the cat) by the phosphate salts (such as Sodium acid pyrophosphate). This magnified taste of protein "“ though chemically achieved "“ is what keeps cats addicted to a "cheap pet food that no one wants to eat".

Tetrasodium pyrophosphate (another name for sodium pyrophosphate) is stated on Wikipedia (quoting Handbook of food toxicology) "toxicity is approximately twice that of table salt when ingested orally."

InRFood.com states "Ingesting sodium acid pyrophosphate in large quantities can lead to diarrhea, nausea or vomiting, whereas its inhalation may cause nosebleeds, irritation in the respiratory tract, coughing or chest pain. Skin contact with the compound may cause severe to mild skin irritation or chapping the of skin. Those who are pregnant or have heart disease or diabetes should limit consumption of sodium acid pyrophosphate due to its sodium content."

It makes one wonder "“ if toxicity studies have ever taken into consideration a pet that would be consuming the pyrophosphates day in and day out over their lifetime. (I doubt it.)

AFB International states for a dog the sense of smell is what pet food manufacturers are selling to. "The takeaway lesson is that if the palatant smells appealing, the dog will dive in with instant and obvious zeal, and the owner will assume the food is a hit. When in reality it might have only smelled like a hit." In other words, the dog food need only smell like meat to the dog "“ that’s the concern of many pet food manufacturers.

What a shame there is such a thing as a billion dollar industry to just flavor pet foods"¦’cutting-edge science to convince dogs and cats to eat what’s in front of them.’ I believe the explanation for why there is this billion dollar industry (pet food flavors) was mentioned early in the Chemistry of Kibble article"¦"cheap". Pet food manufacturers make more money (more profit) using cheap ingredients adding cutting edge science flavorings convincing the pet via taste receptors it’s real food. What a shame.

Wishing you and your pet(s) the best,

Susan Thixton

TruthaboutPetFood.com

Association for Truth in Pet Food

Pet Food Safety Advocate

Author Buyer Beware, Co-Author Dinner PAWsible

exkalibur

What's in Milk-bone ??

Interesting......Straight from the manufacturer's site.

INGREDIENTS

Wheat Flour, Wheat Bran, Meat and Bone Meal, Milk, Wheat Germ, Beef Fat (Preserved with BHA), Salt, Natural Flavor, Dicalcium Phosphate, Calcium Carbonate, Brewers Dried Yeast, Malted Barley Flour, Sodium Metabisulfite (Used as a Preservative), Choline Chloride, Minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Manganous Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Niacin Supplement, d-Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement), BHA (used as a preservative).

Meat and Bone Meal :

AAFCO definition "is the rendered product from mammal tissues, including bone, exclusive of any added blood, hair, hoof, horn, hide trimmings, manure, stomach and rumen contents". This ingredient was associated with pentobarbital (thus a euthanized animal) by FDA testing.

Natural Flavor :

Here’s what the FDA has to say about natural flavors:

"With respect to flavors, pet foods often contain digests, which are materials treated with heat, enzymes and/or acids to form concentrated natural flavors. Only a small amount of a "chicken digest" is needed to produce a "Chicken Flavored Cat Food, even though no actual chicken is added to the food."

What this means is that as long as the flavor comes from some plant, animal, or even mined source, a dog food company can call it natural, as long as it produces the chemical flavor naturally. In many cases, this means that the manufacturer has extracted flavors from animal products or even chemically produced it, concentrated it, and then added it to the dog food.

Read Between the lines :

As you can see, when a dog food says "Made with Natural Flavors," you can’t be entirely sure what that’s claiming. You can check the content label, but there you might only find the listing "Natural Flavors," without any indication of what that means. In fact, many pet food makers use "proprietary" flavorings, flavors they developed themselves, whose ingredients they’re not obligated to detail on the packaging.

To muddy the waters even more, the FDA tells us that "artificial flavors are rarely used in pet foods." Thus, the declaration of "All Natural" on dog food labels is often redundant since one food is as likely to use "natural flavors" as another, making a large number of the pet foods on the market "All Natural."

So what can you, the dog owner and consumer, do to make sure that you are feeding your dog only the most natural foods? You can either make your own dog food, a time consuming choice for most folks, or purchase a high quality food from a food manufacturer that you have experience with and trust. In addition, you can always talk to your vet about the specifics of a food you’re buying, or thinking of.

Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) & butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) :

Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydrozyttoluene (BHT) are antioxidants used to preserve pet & human foods by preventing oxidization. They both keep fats and oils from going rancid and are found commonly found in less expensive pet foods as well as food for humans like cereals, chewing gum, potato chips, etc. There is a definite concern that they may cause cancer. There are studies that indicate the structure of BHA and BHT will change during this process of preserving food and may form a compound that cause adverse reactions. Apparently BHA and BHT are not stable or inert and they do not just hang out and then get excreted. While manufacturers use this as a cheap preservative, there may be the potential risk to some animals and some people for cancer.

Dicalcium Phosphate : It is used to add texture to food but it has so many problems including...

1) It is non-hygroscopic by nature (meaning it will not absorb water). Therefore, it is nearly "insoluble" and contribute to soft tissue calcification.

2) It contains inorganic calcium which is clearly not even remotely close to the best sources of the element.

3) It is a possible cause of kidney stones according to some studies

4) It is a definite alkalizer which can hinder the absorption of minerals.

5) It is works against other minerals such as manganese.

Sodium Bisulfate :

Menadione Sodium Bisulfate is a synthetic version of vitamin K. You'll see it within the fine print of many pet food ingredient lists. In addition, of course, it's not as simple to find as it should be. Some pet food ingredient lists will say 'menadione', some will say 'sodium bisulfate', and some will mention vitamin K3 in parenthesis -- and these are just a few of the possible variations you have to look for.

This ingredient is added to pet foods and treats as an inexpensive source of vitamin K. In people, deficiencies of vitamin K can lead to blood clotting, particularly in the stomach, and can lead to intestinal complications. An example in reference to pets, veterinarians will administer an injection of K1 (not the synthetic K3) to a pet who has consumed a rat poison which causes internal bleeding. Food sources of natural vitamin K (K1) are green leafy vegetables; which are not on the 'top ten' list of many pets. Pet food ingredients that could provide natural sources of vitamin K are alfalfa and kelp. However, as you probably have figured out, synthetic vitamin K or menadione is a great deal less expensive than the natural sources of alfalfa and kelp.

Knowing that a pet food company would opt for a synthetic ingredient in contrast to a natural ingredient is bad enough, but it goes one step further on the 'bad scale' with Menadione Sodium Bisulfate. This ingredient can be highly toxic in high doses. Hazard information regarding menadione lists "carcinogenic effects" and states "the substance is toxic to kidneys, lungs, liver, mucous membranes. Repeated or prolonged exposure to the substance can produce target organs damage." (http://www.sciencelab.com/xMSDS-Menadione sodium bisulfite-9924604) More information on menadione sodium bisulfate and pets can be read at (http://www.dogfoodproject.com/index.php?page...) .

With the science based information available on this ingredient, there is no sound reason for menadione to be considered as a pet food or pet treat ingredient other than being a big money saver for a pet food company. AAFCO and the FDA have no restrictions to the use of menadione in pet foods, and the pet food can even proudly claim 'Natural' on the label even if it contains this un-natural ingredient. Look at the fine print of your pet's food and treats for menadione; sources of natural vitamin K (alfalfa and kelp) seem to be a far better option.

Hydrochloride :

When you see anything hydrochloride, such as Pyridoxine Hydrochloride or Thiamin Hydrochloride, those are chemical forms of B vitamins that companies add to their products to be able to claim higher RDA values of vitamins. But these are synthetic, chemical forms of vitamins, not real vitamins from foods or plants. Nutritionally, they are near-useless and may actually be bad for you. Also watch out for niacinamide and cyanocobalamin (synthetic vitamin B-12).

Butylated hydroxyanisole :

Better known as BHA "” is "reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen" (a cancer-causing agent). According to the National Institute of Health, BHA in the diet has been found to consistently produce certain types of tumors in laboratory animals. And the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment of the state of California lists BHA under "Chemicals Known to the State to Cause Cancer or Reproductive Toxicity". Yet FDA regulations still permit its use as a fat preservative in food under the assumption it is "generally recognized as safe" in low doses.

The same potentially toxic substance added to a commercial dog food,  and fed every day (sometimes twice a day) year after year is a different matter.

It’s that cumulative exposure that is worrisome. The additive effect of using any artificial preservative relentlessly, especially when it’s suspected of causing cancer.

Sources : http://www.dogfoodproject.com

http://www.aafco.org/

http://www.fda.gov/

dbg10
On 9/5/2011 at 6:40 PM, dbg10 said:

Some information about the ingredient Carrageenan found in some canned pet foods as well as some of the rolled types. It is also widely used in a lot of human foods and other products.

http://raypeat.com/articles/nutrition/carrageenan.shtml

http://www.notmilk.com/carageenan.html

This website http://www.health-nutritionblog.com/carrageenan-allergy-symptoms/ also has a list of foods and other products containing Carrageenan ....

List of Foods With Carrageenan

Examples of foods that may contain carrageenan (4,5,6):

Dairy products: chocolate milk, eggnog, condensed milk, evaporated (canned) milk, milk powder, cheeses (such as cottage cheese, cream cheese), yogurts, spreads, whipping cream substitutes, puddings, whey

Dried nuts and seeds, nut spreads, almond milk

Fat spreads and fat-based desserts

Custard (frozen)

Sherbets, sorbets, ice creams

Dessert gels, fruit jellies

Processed fruits, jams, pie filling

Dried mushrooms, seaweeds

Soybean products, such as soy milk

Canned vegetables, legumes, fruits, meats and fish

Pimento olive stuffing

Processed meats, edible sausage casings

Confectionery: chocolate

Ready-to-eat cereals

Pre-cooked pasta, soups

Rice pudding, rice cake, tapioca pudding

Pizza

Savouries

Batters

Processed egg products

Vinegars, mustards, sauces (like barbecue), salad dressings, relishes and other condiments

Dietetic foods for weight loss

Infant formulas

Dietary supplements

Non-alcoholic drinks: energy and sport drinks, syrups

Alcoholic drinks: apple cider, perry (from fermented pears), mead, beer, distilled beverages, aromatized alcoholic drinks

Other Products Containing Carrageenan

Pills and syrups (like cough syrup)

Toothpastes

Laxatives

Air freshener gels

Cosmetic products

Dog foods and other pet foods

Lubricants

Paints (water-based)

Pesticides

Shoe polish

Source: Ingredients In Cat Food Not Necessarily Good For Cats

dbg10
On 4/1/2013 at 5:36 PM, Pawz said:

From http://truthaboutpetfood2.com/historica ... n-pet-food

 

Quote

Historical Basis for Illegal Waste in Pet Food

Posted by Susan Thixton on April 1, 2013 at 8:57 am

Over many years, whenever I’ve asked the FDA about rendered waste (illegal waste) ingredients in pet foods, the response has always been "˜science’. I’ve been told time and time again, "˜FDA is science based’. So, I asked for the science that proves pet food ingredients sourced from illegal horrendous waste provides quality nutrition for pets. And here’s the FDA’s response"¦

"You asked specifically about the nutritional quality of rendered materials and whether FDA has any evidence to conclude that these materials are a quality source of nutrition for dogs and cats.

There is a historical basis for the use of these ingredients. Rendering of poultry and other animal tissues has been used for over a hundred years as a means of salvaging valuable protein and fat. Please see http://www.fda.gov/ICECI/ComplianceManu... 074717.htm for more information.

All rendered animals are subject to certain regulatory standards (i.e., the animal or tissues derived from these animals must be undecomposed; not contain toxins or chemical substances that may cause the feed product to be considered adulterated under section 402 of the FD&C Act; and must be processed in way that ensures the elimination of harmful microorganisms, such as by heating during rendering or canning).

The Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) provides specific definitions for products from rendering in the AAFCO Official Publication, and many of these definitions include requirements for guarantees for specific nutrients, and some include requirements for tests that indirectly assess digestibility.

There is no FDA requirement for pet foods to be nutritionally complete in order to be marketed. Many states have adopted the model pet food regulations established by AAFCO. These regulations include labeling aspects such as the guaranteed analysis, the nutritional adequacy statement, feeding directions, and calorie statements."

And interestingly "“ the subject line of the FDA’s email responding to my nutritional value of rendered ingredients said: "Response on 4D materials". "4D" by the way is industry language for "˜Dead, Diseased, Dying, and Disabled animals’.

So "“ there is No science to prove that rendered waste provides quality nutrition for pets. The federal agency that claims "˜we are science based’ has no science to prove that rendered waste provides any quality nutrition to the animals that consume it. They only have "˜history’ "“ 100 years of history.

100 years ago the Wright Brothers made the first flight in a heavier-than-air aircraft. Since then we’ve walked on the moon.

100 years ago spiral-bound notebooks were invented. Today "˜notebooks’ don’t include paper and can "˜talk’ to someone across the globe.

100 years ago rendered wastes from the processing of human foods didn’t include a slew of antibiotics, steroids, pesticides, heavy metal contaminants and hormones. Today they do.

Rendered wastes in pet food have been illegal since 1938 (with the enactment of the Food Drug and Cosmetic Act). Every day that has passed since, the FDA has enabled pet food/animal food manufacturers to violate federal law (through FDA Compliance Policies).

C’mon FDA, join the modern world.

FDA said: "All rendered animals are subject to certain regulatory standards (i.e., the animal or tissues derived from these animals must be undecomposed; not contain toxins or chemical substances"¦" It is virtually impossible for 4D animals used in rendered pet food ingredients to be undecomposed. Livestock animals die in the field and often days pass before they are sent to rendering facilities. That farmer did not store the dead cow in a freezer waiting for the renderer to pick up the animal. Rendering company trucks are not refrigerated. And FDA’s statement the rendered pet food ingredients cannot contain toxins or chemical substances is inaccurate "“ and FDA knows this. FDA’s own testing found dog foods to contain pentobarbital "“ a drug used to euthanize animals (can’t get more toxic than that).

And lastly, the FDA tries to allude responsibility by stating "There is no FDA requirement for pet foods to be nutritionally complete in order to be marketed." They try to push the blame on AAFCO/the states. Sorry FDA, the responsibility lies with you. FDA Compliance policies "“ and ONLY FDA Compliance policies allow pet foods to violate federal food safety law. It’s wrong and you know it.

To avoid rendered ingredients in your pet’s food, avoid the ingredients by-product meal, meat and bone meal, animal fat and animal digest "“ FDA’s own testing found these ingredients most likely to contain a euthanized animal.

To learn more about FDA Compliance Policies that allow pet foods to violate federal law, Click Here: http://truthaboutpetfood2.com/disturbin... e-policies

Wishing you and your pet(s) the best,

Susan Thixton

TruthaboutPetFood.com

Association for Truth in Pet Food

Pet Food Safety Advocate

Author Buyer Beware, Co-Author Dinner PAWsible

 

Source: Historical Basis for Illegal Waste in Pet Food

dbg10

From: What cats really want to eat...

On 6/27/2011 at 10:10 AM, MMMM said:

The actual study ~ Geometric Analysis of Macronutrient Selection in the Adult Domestic Cat, Felis catus is recorded here: http://jeb.biologists.org/content/214/6/1039.full

The text below is from: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/larges ... o-eat.html

According to its authors, the Geometric analysis of macronutrient selection in adult domestic cats, Felis Catus is the most extensive study of macronutrient regulation ever conducted on any carnivore.

The results of this study are extremely exciting, but not surprising to those of us who understand the importance of providing species-appropriate animal food to companion animals.

The study was conducted to determine if adult domesticated cats, given a choice, deliberately select food that is biologically appropriate for them (similar to the prey they would hunt and eat if they lived in the wild).

From the study:

Most domestic cats are fed commercial pet foods by their owners. Some of these products are moist and others are based on a dry formulation.

As well as differing in water content and texture, there are macronutritional differences between wet and dry commercial foods, notably a higher carbohydrate content of dry foods (required for their manufacture).

Our results show strong nutritional regulation, reinforcing the fact that macronutrient regulation is common across trophic levels [feeding positions in a food chain] and providing important information for the design of domestic cat nutritional regimes.

Fascinating Results

Given the option, the cats exclusively chose high-protein food over high-carb food even when there was less of the high-protein food available.

Cats offered a choice of three foods with variable amounts of protein, carbs and fat mixed them to achieve a daily intake as follows:

100 calories or 52 percent from protein

67 calories or 35 percent from fat

24 calories or 12.5 percent from carbs

When the cats were restricted to a high-carbohydrate food, they did not eat enough of it to get the targeted amount of protein (52 percent).

Experienced cats eating dry food increased protein intake and ate less carbohydrates than naïve cats offered the same choices. This indicates, given the option, cats learn to avoid eating excessive amounts of carbs.

Research Proves It: Cats and Carbs Don’t Mix!

Cats are obligate carnivores, meaning they have nutritional requirements that can only be met with a diet based on animal tissue. The macronutrient profile for cats is high in protein and fat, consistent with a meat-based diet.

According to study authors:

The carbohydrate ceiling explains many of the intake patterns seen in both dry and wet diet experiments and suggests that cats may only be able to process ingested carbohydrate up to a certain level.

The feline body is specifically designed for a low carb diet. Indicators your kitty isn’t equipped by nature to process a lot of carbohydrates include:

No taste receptors for sweet flavors

Low rates of glucose uptake in the intestine

No salivary amylase to break down starches

Reduced capacity of pancreatic amylase and intestinal disaccharidases

In other words, cats don’t produce the enzymes required to digest carbohydrates. The only carbs felines eat in the wild are pre-digested and are found in the stomachs of prey animals.

If your kitty’s body is incapable of digesting a heavy carbohydrate load and she’s eating a cat food with high carb content, she’s on track to develop digestive disease and other serious conditions like diabetes and pancreatits related to eating a diet unfit for her species. And certainly, too many carbohydrates aren’t the only problem with most processed pet foods.

What About Your Favorite Feline?

If you’re convinced it’s time to transition your carnivorous kitty to a more biologically-appropriate food, there are a few different ways to approach it.

My favorite, as regular readers of my newsletter know, is to learn how to prepare your pet’s meals at home with ingredients you select based on balanced recipes from an expert nutritional source.

If you don’t feel you have the time or resources right now to prepare homemade meals for your cat, the next best thing is to feed a commercially prepared, balanced, raw diet. These diets are usually found in the freezer section of small or upscale pet boutiques "“ not in the big box pet stores. You can also find a selection online. Unfortunately, this option is just too costly for many pet owners.

If neither of these choices works for you, try taking small steps up the pet food quality ladder. Take a look at my video 13 Pet Foods "“ Ranked From Great to Disastrous to find out where your pet’s food ranks, and how you can make gradual improvements to your beloved kitty’s diet over time.

I also recommend you read here for some great tips on how to decipher the labels on your cat’s pet food like a pro. (The article is about dog food labels, but the information provided can be applied to cat food just as easily.)

Source: What cats really want to eat...

dbg10
On 7/10/2011 at 2:17 AM, Tiffany said:

Use this glossary to choose quality food for your cat.

Reading cat food labels can feel like walking through a briar patch barefoot. Use our common cat food ingredient glossary as a guide when constructing a quality diet for your cat.

The Basics

Cats are obligate carnivores and receive basic nutrients "” protein, fats and carbohydrates "” plus vitamins and minerals from a meat-based diet.

Protein is necessary for healthy bones, muscle tissue and nervous system and is an energy source.

Fats are a concentrated form of energy and necessary to cell structure, a healthy immune system, a healthy coat and the absorption of fat soluble vitamins A, D, E and K. Fats spoil easily; look for natural preservatives.

Carbohydrates come from plants and provide energy and fiber which aid in fecal elimination and healthy bacteria balance in the digestive tract.

The American Association of Feed Control Officers (AAFCO) dictates that ingredients are listed in descending order by volume. Therefore, the first few are the most important.

Below is a list of common cat food ingredients, in the order that they most likely would be found on the label.

Chicken, duck, lamb, turkey meat

These meats are complete protein sources. Quality depends on the source and the cut.

Chicken, duck, lamb, turkey meal

These ingredients are often primary protein sources. Rendered (cooked down) meat is used in dry food. Named meat is usually good quality.

Byproducts

Byproducts are controversial. Some experts warn against feeding byproducts, while others claim that clean byproducts like liver and kidneys are high-quality protein sources.

According to the AAFCO, byproducts are "the non-rendered, clean parts, other than meat, derived from slaughtered mammals. It includes, but is not limited to, lungs, spleen, kidneys, brain, livers, blood, bone, partially defatted low-temperature fatty tissue and stomachs, and intestines freed of their contents. It does not include hair, horns, teeth and hooves."

Inferior or unidentified meat sources include meat and bone meal, beef and bone meal, and byproduct meal. Avoid these ingredients if possible.

Eggs

Eggs are a complete protein source.

Taurine

This essential fatty acid is found in meat. It promotes healthy eyes, heart, and reproduction.

Corn meal gluten or wheat gluten

These ingredients are low grade, inefficient cereal protein. They are prone to mold and other toxins. Wheat is a common allergen, and some experts believe corn’s hypoglycemic index is suspect for development of feline diabetes.

Soy protein

Soy protein is an incomplete plant-based protein source.

Fish

Fish is a good source of protein, but can cause allergic reactions in some cats.

Poultry fat or chicken fat

Poultry fat or chicken fat is a source of Omega-6. Avoid "animal fat" or "beef tallow""” an unidentified fat source and inferior quality, respectively.

Fish oil

Fish oil is a fat source for Omega-3. A proper Omega 6:3 ratio promotes healthy skin and coat.

Tocopherols or mixed tocopherols

These ingredients are a natural antioxidant and vitamin E source that reduce fat and oil spoilage.

BHA (Butylated Hydroxyanisole), BHT (Butylated Hydroxytoluene) and Ethoxyquin

Studies show BHA, BHT and Ethoxyquin are possible carcinogens. These chemical preservatives are added to retard fat spoilage. Avoid these ingredients.

Green vegetables, beet pulp, corn bran, wheat bran

These are fiber sources. (Please see above precaution about wheat and corn.)

Minerals

Calcium, phosphorus, sodium, chlorine potassium, and magnesium aid in bone construction and cell structure. Iron, copper, zinc, iodine, manganese and selenium are responsible for many physiological functions.

Vitamins

Vitamins are essential to life. Fat soluble A, D, E and K are found in animal sources. They promote vision, growth and cell structure. Water soluble C and B vitamins (vitamin B complex, niacin, folic acid, pantothenic acid, biotin and choline) found in liver, fish, eggs and grains are necessary for metabolic processes.

http://www.catchannel.com/Magazines/Cat ... ients.aspx

By Ramona D. Marek, M.S. Ed.

Source: Guide to Common Cat Food Ingredients

dbg10
On 5/2/2012 at 1:40 PM, packmom said:

Because of the Diamond food recall , if you're like me and buy Kirkland .... if you want to switch until the recall goes away , Pawz suggested this one : (thanks Pawz!)

{C}http://www.presidentschoice.ca/LCLOnlin ... prod550005{C}

Chicken meal, chicken, brown rice, oatmeal, dehulled barley, chicken fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols "“ source of vitamin e), natural chicken flavour, tomatoes, whole dried egg, herring meal, flaxseed, salmon oil (source of dha), brewers yeast, whole sweet potatoes, whole carrots, whole blueberries, whole cranberries, whole apples, calcium carbonate, potassium chloride, dicalcium phosphate, sodium chloride, chicory root, choline chloride, vitamins & chelated minerals (vitamin a, vitamin d3, vitamin e, niacin, vitamin c, inositol, d-calcium pantothenate, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, beta carotene, pyridoxine hydrochloride, folic acid, vitamin k, biotin, vitamin b12 supplement, zinc proteinate, ferrous sulphate, iron proteinate, zinc oxide, copper proteinate, copper sulphate, manganese proteinate, manganous oxide, calcium iodate, sodium selenite), probiotics (lactobacillus acidophilus, lactobacillus casei, enterococcus faecium, bifidobacterium thermophilum), dl-methionine, yucca schidigera, dried rosemary.

Source: President's Choice dog food

dbg10
On 7/20/2011 at 11:10 PM, Pawz said:

I wasn't aware of this. k_shok .....

http://www.truthaboutpetfood.com/articl ... -food.html

Quote

Pet Food News

Ever heard of "Regrind" in Pet Food?

by Susan Thixton, on March 24, 2011 at 4:12 pm  0 comments

It was news to me. It seems pet food companies can "regrind" previous batches of kibble and add it back into new batches of pet food. And Pet Parents are none the wiser.

About a week ago I received an email from TruthaboutPetFood.com friend and content contributor Dr. Cathy Alinovi DVM. She asked me if I’d ever heard of "regrind" in pet food. It was nothing I’d heard of before, but it piqued my interest (and caused my mind to race with all sorts of unsettling thoughts). It seems a friend of a friend of Dr. Cathy works for a popular pet food manufacturer. In casual conversation, the friend shared with Dr. Cathy that "regrind" is the process of "˜regrinding’ previously made kibble into another batch of kibble. She was told that they are allowed to add up to 5% for organic pet food and up to 15% for all other types of pet food. AND she was told that it didn’t matter what flavor or type of pet food the regrind was or what flavor or type of pet food the regrind is added to. I was shocked (still am).

So,I took the question to the guru of all things animal feed, Dr. Gary Pusillo. I asked :

I have a question I’m hoping you know about. A pet food manufacturing insider recently shared information about "˜regrind’. I was told that pet food manufacturers are allowed to regrind batches and put back into a new batch of pet food. They told me up to 5% of regrind is allowed in organic foods and up to 15% is allowed in other pet foods. Do you know of this?

And here’s what he told me :

"In my many years of investigating claims concerning animal feeds, I have learned to read what the company policy is regarding GMP’s (Good Manufacturing Practices) and feed quality assurance programs, and then spend some time in the facility watching what actually is practiced.

Companies should have a written "Production Variance Procedure" to ensure that the proper investigation and corrective actions occur in regard to bulk and bag variation from theoretical yield. Quality conscious manufacturers have very precise allowable variances associated with specific batch sizes . Some manufacturers have gone a step further and assign variation values to type of product, packaging, and batch size .

I have been involved in litigation were the animal feed being produced exceeded its tolerance variation because another ingredient was "leaking" into the mixing system; errors in weighing bulk ingredients, valve and switching malfunction, operator error and employees trying to cover up mistakes.

If a discrepancy has been found to be due to contamination, all product from the batch must be appropriately labeled and quarantined; it must not be put back into future batches.

Extruded products often have variations associated with product quality in the first few minutes of the initial product extrusion and prior to the final batch processing. Some manufacturers have procedures to isolate beginning and ending product runs so that they can be "added back" into another batch of the same product.

It is not uncommon to see animal feed manufacturers which store ingredients at an elevated level above a mixer, extruder or other processing equipment. The operator can stand above the mixer and dump hand added ingredients in the machine, as required by the formulation."

(See : he IS the guru of all things animal feed!)

Next, I took this question to a trusted pet food manufacturer (who will remain nameless). Here’s what I was told :

"When the extruder first comes on, it takes several minutes to get everything working exactly the way the kibble is supposed to look. On some start-ups, you might waste as much as a ton of food to get the moisture and shape right.

I am sure some plants will dry this material and will regrind a small percentage and put back into the same diet. Some, also may have a recovery system that actually might return the initial product right back into the extruder during the same production run. This type of equipment is available. This will help improve yield.

Also, some companies will sell this start up material to hog farmers or other animals that are allowed to eat animal protein like chickens."

I also took the same "˜regrind’ questions to AAFCO (American Association of Feed Control Officials). Here’s what else I learned"¦

Neil Lanning (State of Washington Department of Agriculture) told me"¦

Susan:

"I cannot speak for AAFCO on this but in the State of Washington, and our rules are based on 2002 AAFCO Model regulations, we allow companies to rework livestock feed. I do not know of any reason why we would not allow pet food to be reworked. The ingredient list still needs to be accurate and they must still meet guarantees. I suspect the percentages you were told are company policy and not regulatory driven "“ but I certainly do not know all of the different states regulations.

I am not aware of anyone reworking any material that has left the manufacturing plant.

Neil"

And AAFCO President Chad Linton (West Virginia Department of Agriculture) told me"¦

"Susan,

Sorry to be slow in returning your email, but I had sent this question to several pet food companies for clarification with no return. This term is the first that I have heard of it put in this particular context, but I know as a general feed practice, this happens often. The term that I am familiar with is called "rerun". It is just the practice of taking an ingredient that has been used to clean the system of one particular product with another ingredient to make another product. The industry term is call sequencing. I assume that any complete feed if it isn’t used, isn’t adulterated, or otherwise unusable, can be put back into the system. It seems to be a sensible and reasonable practice in a plant to keep costs down and reducing waste, otherwise this product would be landfilled or sent to other means of the food chain, at a cost to the business.

I do not know of any sections in our Official Publication that addresses such practices. This seems to be a company policy issue, not an AAFCO issue. If the product is not adulterated, has the same ingredients, stays within the same guaranteed analysis, I see no reason why a firm can’t do this practice, at any percentages.

I will continue to try and reach the pet food companies and my pet food committee about this question, and when I receive an answer back from them, I will be sure to forward it onto to you. If I can do anything else, please let me know. If you would like to talk to me about, feel free to call me at the number listed below.

Chad S. Linton

Assistant Director

West Virginia Department of Agriculture

Regulatory and Environmental Affairs Division

1900 Kanawha Blvd.; East

Charleston, WV 25305"³

First "“ Many Thanks to Dr. Gary Pusillo, pet food friend, Neil Lanning and Chad Linton for answering my questions!

So, here’s some of my concerns"¦I received an email recently from a concerned pet parent. She wrote me asking what could be done about pet food manufacturers changing their formulas without notifying pet parents. "I would think most food processors don’t understand that changes really are difficult for cats to take if we don’t do it gradually. By the time us as customers realize there is a recipe change we have a sick cat. I have 2 cats w/bladder issues and have to be really careful what I feed and to watch for bladder inflammation and blood in the urine. This can be triggered by food changes, as you know. Also when they change their recipes they might be changing how it will affect the pH of the urine in the bladder.

I bring this up because cat food companies are notorious for changing their recipes and telling no one. I have to watch carefully what I feed because of my cats bladder issues but if I don’t know they’ve made a change I’m lost as to figure what triggered a relapse."

Now just imagine if there was a 15% regrind of a pet food with different ingredients in her current pet food. Her cats get sick. The pet food company tells her there was no ingredient change "“ which would be an honest answer to the direct question did you change your formula? But what wasn’t mentioned or perhaps even known by the pet food customer service representative, was the food contained 15% of a different variety in regrind. Ingredients were changed due to regrind.

What if a "˜grain free’ dog food or cat food "“ which the pet parent paid premium price for "“ contained 15% regrind of a grain included food? What if the first few minutes of the extrusion process produced a food that wasn’t the right mix? Such as too few or too many vitamin and mineral content? Would 15% of this regrind cause a problem with the next batch? Oh my mind wanders to many alarming possibilities.

Dr. Gary Pusillo pointed out the steps that quality minded manufacturers go through to assure the quality and safety of their foods, but what I can’t help but wonder is what happens with manufacturers that have a higher concern of profit than quality?

We do not have certain knowledge/information that any regrind could be a problem for our pets; it could be that regrind is a non-issue. The problem is "“ because regrind is not (has not been) common knowledge to pet parents, because we just don’t know for certain what exactly is reground and put back into another batch, because of an unlimited amount of other possibilities, the unknown IS the problem.

And remember"¦the Pet Food Industry denied me admission to a pet food workshop and trade event (I have to assume it wasn’t just me "“ I’m assuming they would deny any pet food safety advocate admission as well). When are they going to understand that pet food unknowns can’t stay unknown forever. When are they going to understand that pet parents aren’t going to just crawl back into the pet food cave they so politely kept us in for decades? Those days are long gone.

Wishing you and your pet(s) the best,

Susan Thixton

Pet Food Safety Advocate

Author, Buyer Beware

Co-Author Dinner PAWsible

TruthaboutPetFood.com

PetsumerReport.com

 

Source: Ingredients: "Regrind" in Pet Food

dbg10
On 8/1/2012 at 10:38 PM, Pawz said:

From http://www.truthaboutpetfood.com/articl ... re-is.html.....

 

Quote

Ah, But There IS

Written By: Susan Thixton

7-30-2012

Categorized in: Pet Food Ingredients, Pet Food Regulations

The biggest excuse some pet food manufacturers use to not disclose the true quality of meat ingredients in pet food is "there is no definition for human grade." Ah, but there is a clear definition of human grade even if some pet food manufacturers don't want to tell you about it. USDA Inspected and Approved.

This is one of my many pet food peeves. The Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) has no definition of human grade ingredients, but the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) does (inspected and approved). What makes this so frustrating is that members of AAFCO are state representatives of Department of Agriculture. You'd think that since AAFCO representatives are a part of the Department of Agriculture team, they would accept the same definition of human grade as their federal organization...you might think that, but it isn't what happens.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is the mother-ship of all things meat and vegetable (in the U.S.). It is federal Department of Agriculture employees that pass or fail meats - USDA approved or rejected. Per the USDA website "Inspection for wholesomeness is mandatory and is paid for with public funds." If ingredients are graded - such as Prime Beef or Grade A Poultry - the USDA charges a fee to the company wishing to sell graded foods (higher quality/grade = higher price). Rejected meats and meat products (example internal organs) are - according to federal law - not to be sold for consumption...for any reason, for animals or humans.

State Department of Agriculture agencies work in conjunction with the mother-ship USDA. The Food Safety Inspection Services (FSIS) division of the USDA "requires State inspection programs to be at least equal to the Federal inspection program."

So, pet food consumers should be able to assume that because State Agriculture Representatives work together with U.S. Department of Agriculture to inspect and approve meats for consumption (consumed by humans or animals) as federal laws require...the same definition for human grade meats and meat products (USDA Inspected and Approved) would be appropriate for AAFCO...because they ARE State Department of Agriculture Representatives...right?

Wrong.

Somewhere along the way, the FDA took it upon themselves to develop Compliance Policies ({C}http://www.truthaboutpetfood.com/articl ... nd-illegal{C})-fda-compliance-policies.html) allowing pet food meats to bypass the federal laws that the U.S. and State Department of Agricultures work to enforce.

And, somewhere along the way, AAFCO members - although they are State Department of Agriculture employees - decided to ignore the mother-ship's (USDA) definition/requirement of all meats and meat products sold in the U.S. (human grade/Inspected and Approved) and decided to follow the FDA guidance.

It boils down to this...

Federal Law requires all meat sold in the U.S. to be inspected and approved by the USDA; regardless to for human or for animal consumption.

The FDA, through use of Compliance Policies, allows pet food manufacturing to bypass the federal USDA Inspected and Approved.

Pet Food meats and meat products (such as internal organs) are either USDA inspected and approved or they are not.

And the pet food manufacturer knows full well which side of the fence their meat ingredients reside on...further, they can provide you proof of USDA inspected and approved if they wanted to.

If you wish to feed your dog or cat a pet food that is made from the same quality of meats you would feed to any other member of your family...Ask the manufacturer of your pet's food and treats which side of the fence their meat ingredients are from.

Ask them, "Are the meats used in your pet food/treats USDA Inspected and Approved?" The response should be either yes or no. And, if you'd like proof - the pet food/treat manufacturer should be more than willing to provide you evidence to support their claim.

Do not accept the responses...

Answer: "AAFCO has no definition for human grade."

Answer: "Our pet foods are made in a pet food plant, it is illegal for us to state the ingredients are human grade."

Answer: "We use only the finest quality of ingredients."

Answer: "Our ingredients are sourced from USDA inspected facilities."

Using simple logic, if a pet food bothers to use USDA inspected and approved meats and vegetables - they will be more than happy to provide you a 'Yes' to your question and further provide clarification. For example from some pet food companies you will hear the response...

Answer: "Yes, all meat and vegetable ingredients are USDA inspected and approved; poultry is Grade A, Beef is Prime, vegetables are Restaurant grade."

Don't believe for one moment that they can't tell you. Regulations do not allow for reference to grade or quality on the pet food label, and regulations do not allow for the 'human grade' statement on labels unless a pet food is manufactured in a human food processing facility. But, with every shipment of poultry or beef or carrots received by the manufacturer comes a description of product purchased. The bill of lading, invoice, and often the food package itself will be marked as USDA Inspected/Approved (if it is Inspected and Approved).

Wishing you and your pet(s) the best,

Susan Thixton

Pet Food Safety Advocate

Author, Buyer Beware

Co-Author Dinner PAWsible

TruthaboutPetFood.com

PetsumerReport.com

 

Source: Definition of Human Grade Meat in Pet Food

dbg10
On 8/15/2013 at 5:59 PM, dbg10 said:
On 12/7/2012 at 0:52 PM, Pawz said:

This information about your typical brand of pet food available at the supermarket is well worth reading ....

http://www.acreaturecomfort.com/truthaboutpetfood.htm

On 12/7/2012 at 1:47 PM, Pawz said:
exkalibur said:

And even with the better brands, small changes in batches can affect the critters......Chief has been having some small tummy issues as soon as we started a new bag of Acana wild prairie (grain free). We switched to another new bag of Acana (chicken and potatoes) and have been hand feeding him every meal: so far so good. He had those episodes at night, about 4 hrs after his last meal but was fine on rice and chicken.....so I suspect that the kibble was the issue.

Acana Wild Prairie Ingredients

Deboned chicken, chicken meal, green peas, turkey meal, chicken liver oil, ï¬eld beans, red lentils, whole potato, deboned turkey, whole egg, deboned walleye, sun-cured alfalfa, pea ï¬bre, chicken liver, herring oil, whole apples, whole pears, sweet potato, pumpkin, butternut squash, parsnips, carrots, spinach greens, cranberries, blueberries, kelp, chicory root, juniper berries, angelica root, marigold flowers, sweet fennel, peppermint leaf, lavender, rosemary.

Acana Chicken & Burbank Potatoes Ingredients

Chicken meal, deboned chicken, whole potato, steel-cut oats, peas, whole egg, deboned flounder, sun-cured alfalfa, chicken fat, oat flakes, chicken liver, chicken liver oil, herring oil, pea fiber, whole apples, whole pears, sweet potato, pumpkin, butternut squash, parsnips, carrots, spinach, cranberries, blueberries, kelp, chicory root, juniper berries, angelica root, marigold flowers, sweet fennel, peppermint leaf, lavender, rosemary.

I don't think there was anything wrong with the kibble. I suspect it may be the beans and lentils in the Wild Prairie recipe that were causing the problem as some dogs have a hard time digesting them.

 

On 12/7/2012 at 2:16 PM, dbg10 said:

I agree... some batches could have dawg-knows-what in them.. added by mistake to a particular batch of food... I notice differences at times in the cat's reactions to their kibble and swear there is something about that lot that upsets their tummies... all of them.. not just Smokey...

I've also noticed times when they refuse to eat a canned food ... all of a sudden... then will eat the next can with a different lot number... it's often Smokey who initially refuses the food as he is fussy and has his digestive problems. I then usually give the food to Sam who will eat anything that isn't nailed down... and if he won't eat it.. I think there's a problem with the food... and dump it.

I had this problem with the Before Grain Chicken cans when I bought 20 cans ..I then waited a week after all of them refused to eat it and I bought 2 cans from Pet Valu .. They ate the Pet Valu cans so I think there was something wrong with the lot number of the cans I bought elsewhere. I had tried to give them 5 cans of it and they all refused the original cans..

PM it certainly looks different when it's shown as an image.. thanks... it really makes you wonder especially about the other odd things that manufacturers add to our pet food and even our human food..

 

On 12/8/2012 at 5:44 PM, Pawz said:
exkalibur said:

He has been on wild prairie for 2 years and never got this kind of reaction before.

 

Dogs often get food intolerances after being fed the same brand. If you still have the bag of Wild Prairie write down the Lot Number of the bag and the go purchase another bag with a different Lot Number.

Or, Horizon makes a formula called Pulses that has lentils and peas as the carbohydrate sources ....try a bag of that and see if Chief has the same reaction.

 

 

Source: What's in your typical dog food kibble

dbg10
On 8/2/2013 at 9:29 PM, Pawz said:

From http://truthaboutpetfood2.com/gosss-wilt ........

Goss’s Wilt

Posted by Susan Thixton on July 31, 2013 at 12:31 pm

 

If your pet food contains a corn ingredient, you have one more concern"¦Goss’s wilt. Goss’s wilt is a bacterial infection of corn. Genetic engineering is/was supposed to prevent the bacteria, but despite genetic engineering, Goss’s wilt is reported to be prevalent in corn crops across the Midwest this summer. And our friend "“ Dr. Gary Pusillo (animal feed forensic scientist) "“ warns if Goss’s wilt corn makes it into pet foods, the outcome will be bad.

Goss’s wilt is described as a bacteria (Cornebacterium nebraskense) that ultimately can destroy 50% of a corn crop and make it prone to deadly aflatoxins. Leaves on the corn plant turn brown and resemble drought stricken plants and other plant diseases. The disease can survive in debris over winter, reinfecting the next crop or it can be spread on farm equipment and legs of animals.

The concern for pet food consumers is grain experts state Goss’s wilt corn is linked to deadly aflatoxins. Aflatoxin contamination in pet foods can be deadly, even small amounts of aflatoxins over years can result in serious illness. "After ingestion, aflatoxins are absorbed and carried to the liver via the circulatory system. They are then converted by the liver into toxic reactive epoxides which bind covalently to intracellular macromolecules such as DNA, RNA and protein enzymes, resulting in damage to liver cells."

Besides the risk of aflatoxins with grain ingredients, there is another concern. In researching Goss’s wilt, the main chemical in Monsanto’s weed control product Roundup "“ glyphosate "“ kept being listed in Google searches for more information. Many experts around the world are linking glyphosate to plant diseases "“ including Goss’s wilt and serious health risks including birth defects, genetic damage, cancer, neurological and behavior changes, brain tumors and more.

Dr. Michael Fox "“ friend and pet health advocate provides a very concerning review of glyphosates stating "My advice to consumers, parents and pet owners alike, is to avoid all corn, canola, beet sugar and soy-containing consumables unless they are organically certified. All community uses of herbicides and other pesticides need to be confronted especially where their use exposes children and companion animals to unnecessary risk, as well as indigenous wildlife, including aquatic affected by run-off. Garden supply centers should be informed and only permitted to sell less harmful lawn and garden weed control products. Applying the precautionary principle, in the light of considerable scientific evidence of the health risks of this class of chemicals, is common sense after all is said and done."

A Wales based website shares that science has linked glyphosate to intestinal disorders"¦"glyphosate can cause micronutrients, especially manganese, to become unavailable and thus lead to deficiency diseases. A similar process is suspected to take place in the digestive tract of humans and animals. In certain circumstances, glypohosate can affect the microflora of the gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals. The first studies dealing with this topic fear that the gradual negative impact on the intestinal microflora is most likely the cause of long-term health consequences."

And then there is still the concern of what the bacteria itself of Goss’s wilt might cause to the pets that would consume corn effected by the bacteria.

Any way you look at it, there is little benefit of corn ingredients in our pet foods.

Wishing you and your pet(s) the best,

Susan Thixton

TruthaboutPetFood.com

Association for Truth in Pet Food

Pet Food Safety Advocate

Author Buyer Beware, Co-Author Dinner PAWsible

 

Source: Another Concern About Corn in Petfood

dbg10
On 9/5/2011 at 7:02 PM, dbg10 said:

Some information about the ingredient Carrageenan found in some canned pet foods as well as some of the rolled types. It is also widely used in a lot of human foods and other products.

http://raypeat.com/articles/nutrition/carrageenan.shtml

http://www.notmilk.com/carageenan.html

This website http://www.health-nutritionblog.com/carrageenan-allergy-symptoms/ also has a list of foods and other products containing Carrageenan ....

List of Foods With Carrageenan

Examples of foods that may contain carrageenan (4,5,6):

Dairy products: chocolate milk, eggnog, condensed milk, evaporated (canned) milk, milk powder, cheeses (such as cottage cheese, cream cheese), yogurts, spreads, whipping cream substitutes, puddings, whey

Dried nuts and seeds, nut spreads, almond milk

Fat spreads and fat-based desserts

Custard (frozen)

Sherbets, sorbets, ice creams

Dessert gels, fruit jellies

Processed fruits, jams, pie filling

Dried mushrooms, seaweeds

Soybean products, such as soy milk

Canned vegetables, legumes, fruits, meats and fish

Pimento olive stuffing

Processed meats, edible sausage casings

Confectionery: chocolate

Ready-to-eat cereals

Pre-cooked pasta, soups

Rice pudding, rice cake, tapioca pudding

Pizza

Savouries

Batters

Processed egg products

Vinegars, mustards, sauces (like barbecue), salad dressings, relishes and other condiments

Dietetic foods for weight loss

Infant formulas

Dietary supplements

Non-alcoholic drinks: energy and sport drinks, syrups

Alcoholic drinks: apple cider, perry (from fermented pears), mead, beer, distilled beverages, aromatized alcoholic drinks

Other Products Containing Carrageenan

Pills and syrups (like cough syrup)

Toothpastes

Laxatives

Air freshener gels

Cosmetic products

Dog foods and other pet foods

Lubricants

Paints (water-based)

Pesticides

Shoe polish

Source: Ingredients In Dog Food Not Necessarily Good For Dogs

dbg10
On 8/1/2013 at 7:29 PM, dbg10 said:

Pet Food Ingredients

What is Real Meat?

Posted by Susan Thixton on July 31, 2013 at 11:39 am

Pet food advertising uses this line all the time "“ "˜Made with Real Chicken’ or "˜Real Chicken is our 1st Ingredient’. So what is "˜real’ chicken "“ what do they mean by "˜real’? Here’s what some pet food manufacturers told me about "˜real’ meat.

"Real" is not defined within AAFCO pet food definitions. Despite that, many pet food companies proudly state their pet foods are made with "real" ingredients. Most of the responses were similar, most told me "˜real’ implies meat (when used with a meat ingredient).

Here’s what they were asked"¦

"This is sort of a silly question "“ but I’ve noticed that you (pet food company I am speaking with) and several other pet food companies use this same term and I don’t understand what it means. You say you include real chicken (or what ever the exact phrase is for that company) in your pet food"¦what does "˜real’ mean?"

Purina One’s website (True Instinct Dog Food) states "Real Turkey is the #1 ingredient". When asked what "˜real turkey’ means, the Purina One representative told me "real" means muscle tissue not by-products. A follow up question asked does "˜real’ mean human quality meat? He responded no, that it only implies muscle tissue.

Purina "“ real means muscle tissue.

On the Iams website, (Naturals dog food) it states "Real chicken, fish, or lamb meal to help build and maintain strong, lean muscles." (Note this claim is with a meat meal ingredient "“ rendered ingredient.) When asked what "˜real’ means, Iams told me "˜real’ means their meat meals have real protein in them. She explained that their meat meals go through a special refining process where they take out all the bones, beaks and feathers. When I told her that it was still confusing to me "“ she shared there are different grades of meat meals and again referred to the Iams special refining process for their meat meals.

Iams "“ real means high quality meat meals "“ no bones, beaks or feathers.

On the Eukanuba website, (Naturally Wild pet foods) it states "Real lamb meat is #1 ingredient" and "Real Animal Protein #1 Ingredient". When asked to explain what "˜real’ means, Eukanuba was the first (thus far) to be a bit honest. They stated there is no legal definition of "˜real’, that it is more of a marketing term. The Eukanuba representative also stated "˜real’ means no by-products "“ no skin or bones "“ meat only. She shared Eukanuba follows AAFCO guidelines stating, as example, AAFCO’s definition of lamb is just lamb meat.

Eukanuba "“ real is actually marketing, but means no by-products.

On the Blue Buffalo website it states (Life Protection pet food) "Real meat "“ always the first ingredient". The Blue Buffalo representative told me she didn’t know why the word real was used. She shared she knew that their food uses deboned meat as the first ingredient. When I shared that it was just puzzling why the word real is used by so many she asked me if I wanted her to go ask another representative "“ yes I did. She came back saying that it is Blue’s intention that "˜real’ means a meat not a meal or by-product.

Blue Buffalo "“ real means meat, not a meat meal or by-product.

The Nutro website states "Natural Choice® Cat Food features real poultry or fish as the #1 ingredient in our dry and loaf formulas"¦" The Nutro Representative told me "˜real’ means nothing that is artificial. She gave the example that some pet foods use a lot of other things in a meat ingredient and Nutro doesn’t "“ it’s just the meat.

Nutro "“ real means nothing artificial, meat.

The Science Diet website (cat food) states "Real chicken 1st ingredient". Hill’s Science Diet was the second company to be honest stating "˜real’ is more of a marketing term. Science Diet never explained their intention of the word real, their representative only stated Science Diet’s chicken is meat mechanically deboned primarily from chicken necks and backs.

Science Diet "“ real is a marketing term.

The Innova website (puppy food) states "Each bite is packed with real turkey and chicken to meet a puppy’s increased protein and energy requirements." The Innova representative told me "˜real’ means no by-products. She shared it is "much like you going to the grocery and buying chicken breasts". I asked why don’t they just say "˜chicken meat’ instead of "˜real chicken’ (I was implying on the website) she said there were certain ways pet foods have to be labeled and it could not be stated as "˜real’ on the label.

Innova "“ real means no by-products.

Meriam-Webster.com defines "˜real’ as "not artificial, fraudulent, or illusory; being precisely what the name implies." (Clearly, Meriam-Webster isn’t familiar with pet food’s definition of real.)

The real "˜real’ is USDA inspected and approved, Grade A, Prime, Choice. If a meat is truly "˜real’, it should be nothing less than the same quality of foods sold for human consumption. Anything less is not real "“ it’s fake.

Ask your pet food company "Are the meat ingredients in your pet food USDA inspected and approved?" Make certain they respond to the "and approved". Many pet foods will give half answers such as "˜all our meats come from USDA inspected facilities’. But they did not respond to are your meat ingredients USDA inspected and approved. Pay close attention to how they respond.

Note: All of the pet foods that have provided their Pledge have given consumers this information (in writing and sworn to be true by CEO or President).

Wishing you and your pet(s) the best,

Susan Thixton

TruthaboutPetFood.com

Association for Truth in Pet Food

Pet Food Safety Advocate

Author Buyer Beware, Co-Author Dinner PAWsible

 

Source: Pet Food Ingredients - What is Real Meat?

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